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Gospel Men Seminar
Saturday, July 28, 2018
How to Study the Bible
Saturday, August 18, 2017

Blog


Apr 17

Members Meeting Reminder

2018 | by Asher Griffin | Category: Announcement

Members Meeting April

If you’re a member, we hope you will plan to attend our Members Meeting, WednesdayApril 25 from 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM. Childcare will be provided (nursery to four years old). We’ll also have our usual church-wide dinner at 5:30 PM.

Members should have received this email two weeks ago. If you didn’t receive it, please email Ron@desertspringschurch.org.

We’ll use these meetings to pray together, affirm believers into membership, and to talk about things like the present and future of DSC, or missions and local outreach opportunities.

Apr 17

Paul’s Missionary Journey

2018 | by Asher Griffin | Category: Sermon Follow-Up

In Sunday’s sermon from Acts 28, Ryan Kelly showed a map of the Apostle Paul’s missionary travels throughout the book of Acts. The map he showed is available below.

Paul's Missionary Journey

A couple of ways you can use this map:

  1. Print it out and keep for reference.
  2. Search, in your Bible, through each stage is Paul’s missionary journeys using headings or key words.
  3. Think of crafts or chalk drawings to do with your children that would visually help them see all the places the Lord led Paul.
  4. Remind yourself of what God said would be done in Acts 1:8 and compare it with what He did throughout Acts.
  5. See Acts not just as some stories about Paul’s adventures, but as God’s sovereign plan unfolding before our eyes.
  6. Praise the Lord with others in seeing His grace and mercy extending to the end of the earth.

Jan 31

Rodrigo Barrera’s Passing

2018 | by admin | Category: Announcement
barreras

Carol and Rodrigo Barrera

Dear Church,

Rodrigo Barrera went to be with the Lord on Tuesday, January 30, 2018. Since 2004, Desert Springs Church has partnered with Rodrigo and his wife, Carol, to reach the Mayan Achi living in Guatemala. The Barreras faithfully served the Achi through translating the Bible into the Achi language and through the making of disciples. For over three decades they have served as missionaries, including during the difficult time of the Guatemalan Civil War (1960-1996).

In 2010, numerous members and leaders of Desert Springs flew down to Guatemala to join the Barreras in celebration of the completion of the Achi New Testament. The village of San Miguel had a parade down the middle of the street to celebrate; little Achi children were even seen running around in cardboard boxes dressed up as Bibles!

Since the completion of the New Testament, the Barreras helped to form an indigenous Old Testament translation team. They also accompanied DSC twice a year for our mission trips-for our annual pastoral training trip in January and for our medical trip in May. Rodrigo was known for his warm, welcoming personality. If you sat in his house during the afternoons, you could witness young Achi men come to visit him for counseling and prayer.

We will miss our gospel partner, but not for long. We look forward to the day when we will join him in the presence of our King. We are thankful for God’s work in Rodrigo. We praise Him for Rodigro’s salvation and for enabling him to persevere in the faith until the end of his days on this earth.

Please join us in prayer for his wife, his children, and his grandchildren.

Oct 31

Reformation Day

2017 | by Ryan Kelly | Category: The Church,Worship

It was 500 years ago.

In the year, 1517, in Wittenberg, Germany, a Catholic monk named Martin Luther had been studying and lecturing on Paul’s letter to the Romans. He became fearfully captivated by one word near the beginning of Romans: “in [the gospel] the righteousness of God is revealed” (1:17). Luther later explained that he hated that phrase “righteousness of God,” for God’s righteousness, he thought, surely meant God’s righteous punishment of all unrighteous sinners. Knowing himself to be a sinner, he wrestled with “a fierce and troubled conscience” and “beat upon” the text to know what Paul meant.

At the same time Luther had another concern, but this one with increasing clarity. The Catholic Church had for many years sold indulgences. For a fee, one could pay-off the guilt and payment of sins. A new salesman of indulgences, Johann Tetzel, was creatively and aggressively making a bad practice worse. Luther had written against Tetzel’s tactics before, but now Tetzel was coming to Luther’s town of Wittenberg. So on October 31, 1517, Luther nailed to the church door Ninety-Five Theses meant to engender academic debate about such indulgences. At the time, no one could have anticipated—not even Luther himself—the reverberating effects of this moment. While many events, documents, and people were used of the Lord to bring about the Protestant Reformation, for 500 years the church has looked back to the nailing of Ninety-Five Theses upon the church door as a pivotal moment towards the recovery of the gospel.

While Luther’s concerns for indulgences grew in conviction and clarity, he continued to struggle with his own guilty conscience and how God’s righteousness could be good news (a gospel) for sinners. The “righteousness of God” in Romans 1:17 was of no comfort to him until the context made it clear: “the righteousness of God is revealed from faith to faith, as it is written, ‘The righteous shall live by faith.’” Like a lightning bolt, it hit him: God’s just-righteousness was a gift from God to those who believe; God’s just mercy is revealed in the gospel of Christ’s substitutionary sacrifice. “Immediately I saw the whole of Scripture in a different light,” he wrote. “I felt that I was altogether born again and had entered paradise through its open doors.” That word which Luther once hated—righteousness—had now come to be the source of all his hope and joy. In Romans, he later attested, there is the “very purest gospel; …every Christian should know it…[and] occupy himself with it every day, as the daily bread of the soul. It can never be read or pondered too much, and the more it is dealt with, the more precious it becomes and the better it tastes.”

This is the essence of the Reformation. It’s what we celebrate today.

Oct 6

Guest Preacher This Sunday – Michael Lawrence

2017 | by Asher Griffin | Category: Announcement,Sermon Preview,This Sunday

From time to time, DSC has been blessed to have guest preachers who bring the Word to us on Sunday mornings. This Sunday morning, we will joined by Michael Lawrence, where Michael will be preaching in our services from 1 Kings 10.

We’ve been grateful to host Michael for most of this week, as he’s been one of the speakers for the Simeon Trust Workshop on Biblical Exposition hosted by DSC for many regional pastors.

Some of his written works are his contributions to the 9Marks Journal, Christian History Magazine, Boundless, and Preaching Today.

He’s contributed to books like Why I am a Baptist, edited by Tom Nettles and Russel Moore, and Sex and the Supremacy of Christ, edited by John Piper and Justin Taylor, and It Is Well: Expositions on the Substitutionary Atonement, with co-author Mark Dever.

He has also written Biblical Theology in the Life of the Church, Perspectives on Christian Worship: Five Views, and most recently, Conversion.

Michael comes to us from Portland, Oregon, where he is the Senior Pastor at Hinson Baptist Church. He earned an MDiv at Gordon-Conwell and a PhD from Cambridge University in 2002. Michael is married and has five children.

Hope to see you on Sunday at DSC at either 9AM or 10:45AM!