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Saturday, August 18, 2017

Archive for the Clarus 15 Category


May 23

Claus ’15 Recap: Assembling Under the Word

2015 | by Trent Hunter | Category: Clarus 15

Nehemiah 8 gives us an artfully told story of Israel at one of her best moments: a moment at which she was assembled under the Word with expectancy, attentive listening, a response of weeping and repentance, and a deep joy in God. Ezra had a book in his hands. That’s why the people gathered. That’s why they made a platform for him to stand on. That’s why they responded as they did. As Alistair Begg recently put it, “The expectation of the people was tied not to the ability of Ezra, but to the book that he held in his hand.” So it should be for the church.

An important part of our life in the Word together as Christians is weekly preaching. Yet, for as much time as we spend listening to preaching as Christians, we could afford to think longer and harder on the subject. What exactly is preaching? What does preaching do? How should we do it and hear it?

These are the kinds of questions we considered this year at Clarus with Alistair Begg, D.A. Carson, and David Helm. Our theme was, Assembled Under the Word: Preaching and the Church.

Below, you’ll find videos from each of the conference talks, including links to audio and blog summaries. Click here for photos from this year’s conference, here for songs we sang together, and here to download the song, “Your Word.” This is a new text written for and recorded live at this year’s conference.

Alistair Begg

“Assembled Under the Word” – Nehemiah 8 (videoaudio, blog recap)

“Preaching In and Out of Season,” – 2 Timothy 3:16-4:8 (videoaudio, blog recap)

D.A. Carson

“Why does Jesus Tell Stories?” – Matthew 13:10-17, 34-35 (videoaudio, blog recap)

“The Parable of the Good Samaritan” – Luke 10:25-37 (videoaudio, blog recap)

“The Rich Man and Lazarus” – Luke 16:19-31 (videoaudio, blog recap)

David Helm

“Preaching: God’s Strategy” – Acts 17:16-34 (videoaudio, blog recap)

“Preaching: God’s Speech” – Acts 17:16-34 (videoaudio, blog recap)

Panel Discussions

A Panel Discussion with Alistair Begg, D.A. Carson, and David Helm (videoaudio, blog recap)

A Panel Discussion with D.A. Carson and David Helm (videoaudio, blog recap)

Wrap-up posts from previous Clarus conferences:

May 1

New Live Recording of “Your Word”

2015 | by Trent Hunter | Category: Clarus 15

This year at Clarus we learned a new song, “Your Word,” written for the conference and recorded live. That live recording is now available at DSC’s Bandcamp page here.

Enjoy these new words based on Psalm 119, and train your heart to trust God’s Word by singing them throughout the week.

“Your Word (Psalm 119)”
By Drew Hodge

Verse 1
Let my cry come before you
;
Help me to understand your Word;
Let my plea come before you;
Deliver me Lord by your Word.

My lips will pour out praise
for you will teach me.

Chorus

My tongue will sing your Word,
for all your words are true
,
all your words are true
;
My heart will trust you Lord
in everything you do,
everything you do.

Verse 2
Let your hand always help me
;
Teach me to always choose your Word;
I long for your salvation;
I have delighted in your Word.

My soul will live and praise
for you will teach me.

Bridge
When I have gone astray,
seek your servant
Let me not forget your Word.

For links to lyrics, chord sheets, and audio for the songs we sing each Sunday, check out the DSC Music Blog, updated each Monday.

Apr 6

Songs from Clarus ’15

2015 | by Drew Hodge | Category: Clarus 15

Psalm 119:172 says, “My tongue will sing of your word, for all your commandments are right.”

We heard the voice of God at Clarus ’15 as His Word was preached, prayed and sung.

Below is a list of the songs used at this years conference. You will find chord charts, lyrics, and mp3’s. May God use these songs to tune your hearts to sing His praise!

Friday Night:

  • “Come Thou Fount” (pdfmp3)
  • “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God” (pdfmp3)
  • “Your Word (Psalm 119)” (pdf)
  • “Lord, We Come to Hear Your Word” (pdfmp3)
  • “How Firm a Foundation” (pdfmp3)
  • “Speak O Lord” (pdfmp3)
  • “Blessed Assurance” (pdf)

Saturday Morning:

  • “Your Word (Psalm 119)” (pdf)
  • “Jesus the Name High Over All” (pdfmp3)
  • “Come Thou Almighty King” (pdfmp3)
  • “O Church Arise” (pdfmp3)
  • “Oh How Good it Is” (pdfmp3)
  • “Be Thou My Vision” (pdfmp3)

Saturday Afternoon:

  • “All Creatures of Our God and King” (pdfmp3)
  • “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God” (pdfmp3)
  • “Tis So Sweet” (pdf)
  • “Lord, We Come to Hear Your Word” (pdfmp3)
  • “Your Word (Psalm 119)” (pdf)
  • “Come Thou Fount” (pdfmp3)
  • “How Firm a Foundation” (pdfmp3)

Sunday Morning:

  • “Your Word (Psalm 119)” (pdf)
  • “Come Ye Sinners” (pdfmp3)
  • “Grace Greater Than Our Sin” (pdfmp3)
  • “We Give Thanks” (pdfmp3)
  • “Lord, We Come to Hear Your Word” (pdfmp3)
  • “And Can It Be” (pdfmp3)

Mar 22

Session 9 Recap: Carson, “The Rich Man and Lazarus”

2015 | by Nathan Sherman | Category: Clarus 15

Editor’s Note: Peter Arndt is a Community Group Leader at Desert Springs Church in Albuquerque, NM. This post is a summary of D.A. Carson’s message from Sunday morning at Clarus, March 22, “The Rich Man and Lazarus,” from Luke 16:19-31.

•••••

Dr. Carson began the final session of Clarus 2015 by asking question of this parable: is Jesus saying that a simple reversal takes place in status between this world and the next? While at first glance, it appears this might be the case, but the rest of Scripture denies an idea this simplistic. Wealth in this world does not always result in suffering in the next, e.g., Abraham, Job, and Philemon.

Wealth as a means of self-justification is a major theme throughout the gospel according to Luke, and the rich man in this parable proves himself to be devoted to one master (wealth) and despising the other (God – Luke 16:11-13). He worships wealth as an idol and is blind to the suffering around him. Dr. Carson explained in the society of Lazarus’ day, the rich were to care for the poor, so the rich man failed to meet his responsibility. By not naming the rich man, who seems so important and posh, Jesus is identifying him as eternally not that important. Lazarus means “the one whom God helps,” and while it is initially difficult to see this to be true, by the end of the story, its clear who it is God helps. We can’t make our assessments of who God helps in this life alone—it’s too complex.

Their situation is reversed, in a sense, now eternally as the rich man is suffering and Lazarus is at rest at Abraham’s bosom. The rich man shows no signs of repentance—no acknowledgment of his wronging Lazarus—only a desire to relieve his suffering. Abraham speaks of how the rich man’s suffering is fitting judgment for his life and that his condition is irreversible. He appeals to Abraham to warn his loved ones of this place of torment, thinking incorrectly about what causes repentance in men. Dr. Carson observed that, as far as he can tell, there is not a hint that anyone will ever repent in hell. In this parable there is not a hint of contrition, apology, repentance on the part of the rich man—only the view that his view of the world is right over and against God’s. Just as in this life, in hell, the damned are still trying to justify themselves.

Abraham corrects the rich man by saying it is Moses and the prophet’s words that brings repentance, not messengers from the dead. This remains a poignant lesson also for this current age where men still seek signs—we have the Bible, which is all we need to bring repentance.

Dr. Carson concluded with three theological and pastoral reflections on this passage:

  1. There is a sphere of rejoicing to pursue,and there is a place of torment to flee.
  2. The things in which we take so much pride now (wealth, religious privilege, good looks, success and recognition) may actually blind us to our need for grace.
  3. God has not left himself without witness. We must listen to the witness of Scripture or we are dead.

The parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus challenges all of us to choose God’s eternal rewards over earth’s temporal treasures, for once this life is over there is no undoing of the consequences.

 

Mar 22

Clarus ’15 Photo Roundup, Sunday, March 22

2015 | by Ben Moore | Category: Clarus 15

BEN_6036 BEN_6037 BEN_6041 BEN_6044 BEN_6049 BEN_6052 BEN_6059 BEN_6078

Conference Photography by Ben Moore Photography. Contact Ben at ben236@me.com.